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Luminous Portraits of Sliced Fruit Glow Like Stained Glass Windows

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Rosettes Series #16, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Artist Dennis Wojtkiewicz paints enormous portraits of sliced fruit, often scaling four feet across or more. Each oil on canvas painting focuses exclusively on the edible subject, with dramatic backlit lighting seeming to light up the melons, citrus, apples, and kiwis. While Wojtkiewicz focuses on tiny details like individual segments of juice, striations, and the fuzzy skins, the realism is tempered by a slightly hazy, impressionistic finish. The artist is represented by Robert Kidd Gallery. You can see more of his paintings on his website. (via My Modern Met)

Melon Series #34, oil on canvas, 30 x 60 inches

Citrus Series #15, oil on canvas, 37 x 64 inches

Apple Series #2, oil on canvas, 48 x 50 inches

Rosettes Series #17, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Kiwi Series #4, oil on canvas, 48 x 44 inches

Rosettes Series #15, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Horn Melon Series #4, oil on canvas, 36 x 72 inches

Citrus Series #8, oil on canvas, 36 x 60 inches

Rosettes Series #13, oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches

Citrus Series #12, oil on canvas, 27 x 72 inches

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silentpark
4 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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What Makes People the Most Happy

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It's in the details of 100,000 moments. I analyzed the crowd-sourced corpus to see what brought the most smiles.

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silentpark
14 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Immigration in the United States visualized as rings of tree trunk

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Pedro M. Cruz, John Wihbey, Avni Ghael and Felipe Shibuya from Northeastern University used a tree metaphor to represent a couple centuries of immigration in the United States:

Like countries, trees can be hundreds, even thousands, of years old. Cells grow slowly, and the pattern of growth influences the shape of the trunk. Just as these cells leave an informational mark in the tree, so too do incoming immigrants contribute to the country’s shape.

Feels real.

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silentpark
14 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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1 public comment
jsled
16 days ago
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This is an interesting visualization.

1/ But, I wonder how it compares to a stacked area chart, in terms of understandability.

2/ I wonder what it would look like in population-adjusted terms ("100 immigrants" in 1830's-population-US is different than today).

3/ Goes to show how large the Asian immigrant fraction is.

4/ It does demonstrate well just how relatively *little* immigration we have in the last ~20 years.
South Burlington, Vermont
shockingpuppies
15 days ago
Not sure it actually shows #4. Comparing immigration in the 2000s to the 1850s means visually comparing a thin but wide ring to a wide but narrow ring. I'm guessing very few people could accurately estimate the difference between those two.

Aerial Robot Dragon

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DRAGON is made of a series of linked modules, each of which consists of a pair of ducted fan thrusters that can be actuated in roll and pitch to vector thrust in just about any direction you need. The modules are connected to one another with a powered hinged joint, and the whole robot is driven by an Intel Euclid and powered by a battery pack (providing 3 minutes of flight time)...(Read...)

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silentpark
14 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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How the Earth’s continents will look 250 million years from now

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Speaking of Pangaea, this video shows how the present-day continents came to be formed from the Pangaea supercontinent about 240 million years ago, then shows what the Earth’s surface might look like 250 million years in the future, if the tectonic plates continue to move in predictable ways.

I hope this explanation is helpful. Of course all of this is scientific speculation, we will have to wait and see what happens, but this is my projection based on my understanding of the forces that drive plate motions and the history of past plate motions. Remember: “The past reveals patterns; Patterns inform process; Process permits prediction.”

Look at how quickly India slams into the Asian continent…no wonder the Himalayas are so high.1 And it’s interesting that we’re essentially bookended by two supercontinents, the ancient Pangaea and Pangaea Proxima in the future.

  1. Though they may not be able to grow much more. Erosion and gravity work to keep the maximum height in check.

Tags: maps   Pangaea   science   video
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silentpark
33 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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fxer
33 days ago
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oh man I'm a sucker for tectonics, every time.
Bend, Oregon

A Madrid Plaza Transformed Into a Temporary Park With Over 35,000 Square Feet of Grass

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For the 400th anniversary of Madrid’s Plaza Mayor, urban artist SpY (previously) transformed the bustling square into a centralized place of respite. The temporary park titled Cesped, or “Grass,” was created by bringing in more than 35,000 square feet of sod, which formed a perfect green circle at the center of the pedestrian plaza. Over the course of its four day installation last fall more than 100,000 visitors lounged, played, and rested in the celebratory work.

You can watch a time-lapse installation of the project on the Madrid-based artist’s website, and view more urban interventions on his Instagram.  (via designboom)

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silentpark
97 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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