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Panasonic Lumix BGH1 Box Camera

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Built for livestreamers, broadcasters, and moviemakers, Panasonic's Lumix BGH1 is ideal for multi-camera setups. Its 10.2-megapixel Micro Four Thirds sensor is optimized for 4K video capture, supporting 4:2:0 10-bit C4K/4K...

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silentpark
79 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Jet Airliner Nacelle Becomes A Unique Camper

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It’s possible that some of you will have thought about making a custom camper for yourselves. Some of you may even have gone as far as to build a teardrop caravan. It’s very unlikely though that you’ll have gone as far as [Steve Jones] though, who took an outer engine nacelle from a retired ex-RAF VC-10 airliner and converted it into a camper that is truly one of a kind.

On the face of it a jet engine nacelle should be an easy shell for such a project, but such a simplified view perhaps doesn’t account for the many vents, pipes, and hatches required by the engine in flight. Turning it into a waterproof housing for a camper was a significant job, which he has managed to do while leaving one set of engine access doors available as a large opening for a room with a view.

The nacelle is mounted on a narrowed former caravan chassis, and with an eye-catching window created from its former air intake and a very well executed interior fit-out it makes for a camper that many of us would relish trying for ourselves. You can see a video of it below the break, and we wish we could be lucky enough to encounter it in a campsite one summer.

We’ve shown you our share of campers over the years, but perhaps this 3D printed one has most appeal.

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silentpark
166 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Modular Vibrating ‘Bots Made From PCBs

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Printed circuit boards, they’re a medium designed primarily to mount electrical components with the wires themselves places as copper traces on the boards. To accommodate wide range of needs that have arisen over decades, board houses have evolved all manner of advanced techniques in routing and plating. To our benefit, this also makes it possible to leverage PCBs in an entirely artistic way, taking advantage of the highly-optimized manufacturing process. [GeeekClub] did just that, creating awesome vibrating robots out of custom-made PCBs.

The ‘bots come as a single PCB, with the parts snapped out akin to removing parts from sprues in a plastic model kit. They can then be assembled, with a pair of pager vibration motors installed to provide motive power. But really it’s the aesthetic of the boards and not the functionality that make these so incredible.

The design nestles a coin cell in the base of each bot, providing power and using the weight to help keep them upright. There’s a smattering of LEDs on board, and the art style of the ‘bots draws from Hopi Indian, Asian, and South American influences.

Cyphercon 2017 featured these exciting cubic badges, created from PCBs and soldered by hand.
This Star Trek inspired piece shows just how far you can go with the right color soldermask and some creativity.

This “flat-pack” style of PCB design that comes to life with creative use of angles and layers is becoming its own sub-genre of the art. The Star Trek Enterprise inspired build in another great example. We’ve also seen a growing trend of using the PCB as enclosures, take the Cyphercon badge and Queercon badge projects from 2017 as examples. Get yourself up to speed on design techniques for using FR4 as an enclosure from [Voja Antonic’s] in-depth guide.

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silentpark
166 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Building D-O, The Cone Face Droid

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For many of us, movies are a great source of inspiration for projects, and the Star Wars films are a gift that just keeps giving. The D-O droid featured and the Rise of Skywalker is the equivalent of an abandoned puppy, and with the help of 3D printing, [Matt Denton] has brought it to life. (Video, embedded below.)

D-O is effectively a two-wheeled self-balancing robot, with two thin drive wheels on the outer edges of the main body. A wide flexible tire covers the space between the two wheels, where the electronics are housed, without actually forming part of the drive mechanism. The main drive motors are a pair of geared DC motors with encoders to allow closed-loop control down to very slow speeds. The brains of the operation is an Arduino MKR-W1010 GET on a stack that consists of a motor driver, shield, IMU shields, and prototyping shield. [Matt] did discover a design error on the motor driver board, which caused the main power switching MOSFET to burst into flames from excessive gate voltage. Fortunately he was able to work around this by simply removing the blown MOSFET and bridging the connection with a wire.

The head-on D-O is very expressive and [Matt] used four servos to control its motion, with another three to animate the three antennas on the back of its head. Getting all the mechanics to move smoothly without any slop took a few iterations to get right, and the end result looks and moves very well.

[Matt] worked on the film himself, so he based his build on a design by [Michael Baddeley], another prolific droid builder, to avoid breaching his NDA. He covers the entire development and testing process in a series of videos, and will be releasing the design files and instructions when it’s done.

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silentpark
233 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Striped Eel Catfish Traverse the Ocean Floor as a Strategically Rotating Mass

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For young striped eel catfish, there really is safety in numbers. A recent Instagram post shares a video by Marie-Laure Vergne of about one hundred juvenile fish moving across the bottom of the ocean. The Abyss Dive Center, a scuba diving school located in Amed, Bali, explains in the post that until the fish are fully grown and gain all of their deadly capabilities, they protect themselves by swimming in dense groups. Similar to other catfish, this species has four pairs of barbels on the upper and lower jaws. In their pectoral and first dorsal fins, though, the fish have a highly venomous, and sometimes fatal, spine.

As suggested by The Kids Should See This, the aquatic animals appear to take turns as they move, diving toward the bottom before appearing back at the top only to repeat the cycle. If you focus on one of the fish’s movements, you’ll spot the undulating pattern. The dive center does have a cautionary tip for anyone who encounters the phenomenon: “The young ones can only produce a mild version of the venom, tingling the fingers of the people putting their hands in the school (which we don’t recommend you do! ).”

 

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silentpark
364 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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Bunker in a Box: Multifunctional WWII Furniture Kits Designed for Sheltering in Place [ARTICLE]

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When a retired Chinese inventor unveiled his design of an earthquake-proof bed a few years back, reactions were understandably mixed. The various models look like survival bunkers crossed with torture chambers. In animations, beds that drop into metal boxes and metal flaps flip down or slide up to provide cover, which makes one wonder about limbs. Inside are emergency supplies including water, food, fire extinguishers, gas masks and medical accessories. This idea of turning the spaces in which we spend close to a third of our lives into disaster-proof containers has precedents, though, that date back decades. Arguably, new designs could learn things from these old ones, too.

During World War II, continental European countries like Germany often used cellars as emergency air raid shelters, or purpose-built, above-ground structures like Hochbunkers (high bunkers) made of concrete. In the United Kingdom, cellars were less common, so basements of schools, hospitals, factories and other large buildings often became safe spaces. Getting to these in times was not always easy, though, and there was always a risk of total structural collapse, which could trap shelter seekers under huge piles of rubble.

Designed by John Baker and named after Minister of Home Security, the so-called “Morrison Shelter” was developed as an alternative to basements and other communal shelters. These kit-based boxes featured steel top plates, wire mesh sides and came with tools so they could be easily assembled inside of homes. Moreover, the kits were made available for free to low-income households. By day, the shelters could serve as living room or dining tables. At night, they became a sleeping space for British families. Over half a million were distributed over the course of WWII. A study of homes in which people used these shelters concluded that they did save lives when properly placed inside a house.

Baker worked from real life to evolve his design. He examined actual bomb-damaged homes and concluded that collapsing walls and ceilings were frequently to blame for injuries and deaths that could have been avoided. At the same time, reinforcing entire structures or making entirely bomb-proof shelters was cost-prohibitive.  The designer later explained that “it was impractical to produce a design for mass production that could withstand a direct hit.” Instead, he recalls, it “was a matter of selecting a suitable design target that would save lives in many cases of blast damage to bombed houses.”

As a designed object, these Morrison shelters were quite clever. They served multiple functions so that less space was needed and wasted. Springs in their bases made them more comfortable for sleeping in. Their size accommodated up to two adults with two children. They could also be assembled by a few people in a matter of hours. Above all, they allowed families to sleep in the relative comfort of their own homes rather than clustering in community spaces. They were functional but also a constant reminder of the next potential attack —  potentially reassuring but also perpetually distressing.

Special thanks to 99pi fan John Dyer for the tip.

The post Bunker in a Box: Multifunctional WWII Furniture Kits Designed for Sheltering in Place appeared first on 99% Invisible.

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jepler
455 days ago
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"They were functional but also a constant reminder of the next potential attack — potentially reassuring but also perpetually distressing"
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
silentpark
455 days ago
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Hamburg, Germany
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